haiti, one year later

It was only a year ago that a deadly and devastating earthquake struck Haiti in the the heart of Port-au-Prince, killing and injuring masses of people and leaving hundreds of thousands of people homeless, without food or water.  I was very blessed to have the opportunity to travel to Haiti last April with New Reality International (please go check out their website if you are interested in volunteering or donating in any way!!).  Several of the friends I made in Haiti have the same news to tell as they did 6, 9, and 12 months…no change.  People are still living in tent cities and struggling to find food or water.  There are several ways you can help…donating a tent, donating money securing through NRI or by sponsoring a child for a small amount each year so that they may receive an education and help the future of Haiti…

 

 

To find more photos from Haiti, go under my categories section and click on “Haiti”

update on haiti

I usually reserve Thursday’s for my Resource Room posts, but today I have something more important to blog about…

As y’all know, Haiti is near and dear to my heart after my recent trip to Fonds Parisien and Port-au-Prince back in April (to learn more about my trip, click HERE.)  Yesterday, Laila, our amazing leader and founder of NRI (www.newrealityinternational.org) announced that the Haitian Christian Mission (where I stayed in Haiti) is partnering with NRI to find sponsors for 5 orphans.

The sponsorship is ONLY $420 for one year and covers education and shelter…if you are at all interested, please visit NRI’s website and click on the “sponsorship” menu to learn more.  I cannot stress enough how much these children need food and shelter and education.
I think many people and parents out there wish they could pay for their college education or their child’s education and in this current economic situation, it is becoming harder and more difficult for folks to do that, so if you can spare $420/year, you can help someone else get an education!!!!
Thanks for listening!  :)

haiti, what’s next?

As I mentioned in my last post, there is so much more to do in Haiti and I so want to be apart of it.  Please think of donating new tents (even used ones-in good condition) and eyeglasses!!
There are so many different things the Haitians need, but after visiting, my feelings are that I want to in the educational area.  I feel that if Haitians can continue to go to school and college (which many were destroyed in the earthquake) then they can go on to create a more stable economy and enrich the lives of those in their country.
My current thought is to create a coffee table style photo book and have all proceeds go to charity…for
medical students like Jolius…
and school aged children…
What do you think?  If anyone knows a literary agent, let me know :)
Happy Monday!

haiti days seven and eight

You could feel the sadness in the air during our last two days…of course everyone was ready to get back home to family and needless to say, the comforts of life in North America, but having to say goodbye to friends so quickly made was difficult.

On our seventh day in Haiti, we held a mobile clinic in Port au Prince at a church that had partially collapsed during the earthquake.
We held our clinic on the second floor…
This is the view of the neighborhood from the second story of the church…it was a common sight to see smoke and little flames going as the people would often burn their trash since Haiti has no sanitation department or trash pickup…

 

This is the pastor of the church–he was so helpful and appreciative 
This building was recently finished before our arrival…this is where most of the surgeries took place…

 

On our last working day, three huge trucks pulled up to the mission with rice, canola oil and beans…this was the first time (almost three months after the earthquake) that any food had been distributed in this area…
People waited in line all day clasping onto their tickets which signified if they received food or not…
These guys had “the list” of people and tickets…
The food was from the US and Canada driven in from the Dominican Republic.
These nice tents were actually right behind the mission next to a school.  Many of the school children lived here as well as some of our interpreters and their families…
Some of our amazing translators.
Our group.  It’s still sinking in the fact that I got to go to Haiti, meet all these incredible doctors, nurses and surgeons, photograph them working away at their craft, meeting the selfless Haitians and I can’t wait to do it all over again.

 

So…what’s next?  I’m still figuring that out myself.  After going, I know that I want to/have to/feel the need to return to Haiti.
Please don’t forget that their are still millions of Haitians that are homeless…please email me if you have a tent to donate or eyeglasses (near or far sighted)!!!!  whitney [at] whitneyelizabehtphoto [dot] com
I’m working on a fundraising project for students…please check back Monday for more details as I work the whole thing out.  Thank you so much for checking in to follow my Haiti story…I know most of you visit for wedding photographs.  Happy weekend everyone :)

haiti days five and six

I had so many opportunities bestowed upon me in Haiti-one of them being the chance to photograph live surgeries.  Watching these surgeries was like an out-of-body experience…I couldn’t believe what my eyes were witnessing.  It’s actually quite incredible to watch…it’s an art form.  The surgeons and nurses and anesthesiologist work together in perfect motion to create a new masterpiece…a better body, if you will.

**WARNING:  There is a shot below from a mastectomy that I documented-it’s a bit shocking so don’t say that I didn’t warn you!  This particular surgery was by far the most emotional for me to watch but I was thrilled to know that she has a better chance of now surviving.

This is the little boy I mentioned in my most recent haiti post-he had walked over hot coals and we brought him back to the clinic with us…

 

At the end of day five, I went by one of our mobile clinics for just a bit.  This one was held at a local tent city.

 

And this begins day two of photographing surgeries.  Our surgical team worked all week long to accommodate as many patients as they could while they were in Haiti.  I am so impressed with our entire group that went to Haiti…everyone worked so hard and sometimes through the night to help with the patients that would start lining up at the clinic at 5:30am each morning…

 

After my second day of documenting surgeries, I went to visit Gibson’s family who lives just down the road.  Gibson is a sweet boy who hangs out around the mission…even though we couldn’t speak the same language as his family, it was nice to just sit and enjoy each other’s company…I mean, how often do people do that anymore??

 

 

A few snapshots on the way back to the mission…